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IMMACULATA HISTORY

(Click here to read in Chronological Order)

2012

Fall - Fr. Gerard Beck is assigned as Rector of SMAC, while Fr. John Fullerton moves to Australia to become district superior. Fr. Beck shares his thoughts on the New Immaculata project with the following lines:

Dear St. Mary’s Parishioners, Friends and Benefactors:

The project of building a new Immaculata Church for St. Mary’s, begun by Father Bolduc and furthered by each successive Rector, is a noble endeavor and one dear to our hearts.  Heading up this project is a duty I take seriously, and I applaud the work of my predecessors, who with zeal and fortitude have persevered in a humanly daunting undertaking.  The current design for a church that will seat 1,200 to 1,300 people, completed in the spring of 2012 by Schwerdt Design Group of Topeka, Kansas, is beautifully conceived and admirably compliments the campus as it exists at this time.

Our Lady and St. Joseph daily give us wonderful proof of their solicitude and care for the St. Mary’s parish, academy and college.  We are faced with the herculean task of caring for a 480 acre campus with its 11 magnificent but high-maintenance buildings, while providing an education for nearly 700 academy and 80 college students.  Our efforts and the fruits that come of them are a reminder that with God all things are possible, and the human impossibility of running our schools and simultaneously funding large capital projects is symbolic of the challenge Catholics today face in rebuilding the Catholic Church as a whole. 

Although I am as yet still transitioning in my new assignment as Rector, I want everyone to know that I am planning to hold a New Immaculata update meeting as soon as feasibly possible. A thorough review of the New Immaculata project is but one component of my duties, but I undertake it willingly and with real hope of success.

Generosity and hard work are essential as we move forward, and I encourage all to the same. Since it will only be through God’s goodness and providence that we will one day enjoy a New Immaculata, however, let us not fail to beg unceasingly for His blessing on our efforts.

May God bless you all.

Fr. Gerard Beck, Rector
St. Mary’s Academy & College

2011 Spring - Schwerdt begins presenting their design changes: a single bell-tower instead of two towers; reducing the interior nave height from 90 feet to 67 feet; smaller window openings; and simplified exterior walls, with less niches, angles, and projections than the previous design.  Seating capacity remains at roughly 1,300.
 

Fall - Not counting pledges, nearly $1.3 million in cash has been raised for the New Immaculata project.  Preliminary cost estimate work is done on Schwerdt’s modified design and concludes that the country Gothic design is within our budget.  Fr. Fullerton reports on the progress in his September newsletter to Friends and Benefactors:

“With another school year off to a smooth start, I wish to dedicate this month’s letter to updating you on the New Immaculata Building Project.
In March of 2010, I mentioned that we were in the process of hiring a new architectural firm for the purpose of designing a simpler, country Gothic style church that would honor the legacy of the original Immaculata, harmonize much better with the present architecture of our campus, and bring the project cost down to the original budget of $10 million dollars.  Following the advice of several professionals from our parish in St. Mary’s and from the parish in Denver, we decided to hire an architectural firm from nearby Topeka to redesign the project.
After nearly a year of careful consideration and diligent work, I am happy to say that the new design is nearly complete.  Several pictures of these plans are included in this flyer, and final drawings will be available on our newly designed website by November. 
The new design will meet the pressing needs of our large (over 3,100 faithful) and ever-growing parish.  With comfortable seating for 1,300 faithful, the new church will alleviate the current overcrowding at our 5 Sunday Masses.  Our elderly and disabled parishioners will find all levels of the new building accessible.  A crypt chapel with many side altars will provide our large priest community, as well as visiting priests, sufficient space to offer daily the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.  The basement will include extra classroom space for Academy and catechism classes. 
In the next few months, once the schematic design phase is complete, we hope to develop a building plan that divides the project into phases, allows us to set concrete fundraising goals, and prepares us to break ground in a few years.  We will keep you informed of the progress.
The task of fundraising is always difficult, more so in the present economic crisis.  Over the past years, your sacrifices, both spiritual and material, in behalf of our parish and schools, have enabled us to continue providing Catholic education for our youth.  We are extremely grateful for your past contributions that amount to nearly $1.3 million for the new church.  Thank you for continuing your support now and in the future.  Your generosity is helping us to make the restoration of all things in Christ a reality.  May God reward you abundantly.”

2010 Schwerdt Design Group, an architecture firm in Topeka, Kansas is hired to make the New Immaculata design fit within our budget.  A simpler, country Gothic style design is conceived to honor the original Immaculata, complement campus architecture, and meet the budget requirements.
2009

Dec. 31 – Donations continue to arrive: in 2009, $262,000.00 dollars in cash and $65,000.00 dollars in pledges are committed to the project.

A professional cost estimator from the SSPX parish in Denver goes through all the proposed “New Immaculata” blueprints.  It is determined that the high Gothic design proposed by McCrery Architects admirably fulfills our requirement for a design that is traditional in style, beautiful, and large enough to seat our growing parish.  However, the design will exceed the budgeted cost of $10 million dollars.

2008

Aug. 15 - St. Mary’s bids a fond farewell to Fr. Vicente Griego and welcomes new rector, Fr. John Fullerton.  Fr. Griego takes up his new assignment as rector of the SSPX’s Holy Cross Seminary in Goulburn, Australia, while Fr. Fullerton comes to St. Mary’s after his term as District Superior for the SSPX’s North American district.

Late Summer – The faithful in St. Mary’s respond generously to Fr. Griego’s spring appeal: by the end of 2008, $640,000.00 dollars in cash are raised and $187,000.00 dollars are pledged in St. Mary’s. 

Sunday, Mar. 30 - Rector Fr. Vicente Griego "kicks off" the project in St. Marys, asking the parishioners to donate for their new spiritual home. 

Spring - Bishop Bernard Fellay, Superior General of the Society of St. Pius X, approves the project with these words: 

"I am totally in favor of the proposed plan to build a great church in St. Mary's in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary for the glory of God. Such a magnificent project will take time to complete. It is a problem of our time that we want everything done immediately and perfectly. In past ages, people would go forward gradually. Recall the great cathedrals of Europe, which took over a century to complete!

On my part, there is no problem with the plans to begin now what is necessary to have a 'workable' church in the near future and leave for later, what I call the finishing of the project - like the bell towers and other elements of completion. I am satisfied with the general plan of the building and wish God's blessing on this project.

God's generosity will not be outdone. May the faithful generously support this project, which will demand sacrifice, in order to build a magnificent church in St. Mary's for the glory of God and the honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary."

2007 Dec. 25 - Schematic drawings are returned to St. Mary's from McCrery Architects of Washington DC, showing a proposed "New Immaculata"
2004 Late Winter - A committee is established to investigate the feasibility of constructing a completely new chapel to meet the needs of St. Mary's.  Work progresses from the ground up, starting a fundraising program, and beginning an architect search.
2000 The parish grows to over 2,000 souls. Current rebuilding plans would encompass a 500-seat chapel, which would not even begin to serve the needs of the growing parish and school.  Plans to rebuild the Immaculata in its current form are halted.
1992 Spring - Progress is made in the bell tower of the Immaculata.  Floors, windows, and staircases are completely renovated, making the tower watertight for the first time in nearly fifteen years!
1991 Oct. 2 - A new steeple is fitted to the top of the bell tower by an enormous crane.  The steeple itself weighs over 9,000 pounds, and is topped by a gleaming 6-foot copper cross.
1990 May 25 - Bulldozing begins behind the Immaculata to prepare for rebuilding the church and making a back road to it.  The walls of an old Jesuit cistern are found behind the church, and is converted to a workshop dedicated to the rebuilding of the chapel.
1980 ruinsMay 31 - Archbishop Lefebvre's reconstruction plan had not yet even started when a severe storm with high winds knocked down part of the fire-eaten front wall, thus crushing the porch.  During the following months, another windstorm destoyed the back wall, which fortunately fell outward, leaving the high altar and the statue of Our Lady of Grace untouched.  Also, during these storms, part of the west side wall fell in.  Damage there included the crushing of the side altars.
1979

cornerstone

On August 15th, His Grace officiated at the laying of the cornerstone for the rebuilding of the Immaculata Chapel which burned in a tragic fire in November 1978. Over 1,000 people were present when he applied a trowel full of mortar to the 300 pound piece of Kansas sandstone which was prepared by the Bayer Stone Co. of Saint Marys. Placed in a sealed container with the cornerstone were papers and documents pertaining to the Society of St. Pius X and St. Mary's College, medals, coins and other artifacts, including a current copy of The Angelus. After the blessing of the stone Archbishop Lefebvre called upon two workmen from Saint Mary's Karl Stromberg from California and Albert Gonzalez from Texas to assist him in setting the stone in place.
1978 fireNov. 8 - TRAGEDY.  Volunteers had worked all summer to repair the roof, paint, and bring the chapel back to her former glory after squatters had spent a decade in her walls.  Restoration was nearly complete when a spark from an electrical short caused a fire in the choir loft.  Discovered at 12:53 pm, the fire was fought all afternoon by several area fire departments, and was one of the most hard-fought fires that residents could remember.
It was finally brought under control by 4pm.  The roof was gone, the interior completely gutted, some of the priceless stained-glass windows broken.  The walls and porch, however, remained intact.
1978 immacMay 22 - His Grace Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre inspects St. Mary's and especially admires the Immaculata Chapel. It is because of this magnificent church that he urges Fr. Bolduc to continue negotiations and find the means to acquire St. Mary's for a traditional Catholic center. The chapel seems to him a symbol, raised up in the heart of America, and destined to favor the Catholic renaissance of our great country. Negotiations continue, and in the end, arrangements are made, by which KATO (A Land Grant Company from Phoenix) donates their interest and a benefactor puts up the remaining amount asked by the Jesuits.
1977

Autumn - Traditional Catholics discover St. Mary's and begin attempting to interest the Society of St. Pius X in it. At the invitation of a local dentist, Dr. Eugene McKenzie, priests come from what was the the U.S. District Headquarters on the East Coast and have a look at St. Mary's, but decline.

1972

May 23 - In a ceremony that takes place on the porch of the Faculty Building, the use of St. Mary's is returned by the Jesuits to the Prairie Band of the Potawatomi, who requested it to be given to them. The land and buildings are given in trust for the purpose of developing them into an Indian cultural and educational center open to all tribes. Plans include a home for aged Indians, day care center, vocational school, and alcoholic treatment center. None of these plans materialize, and by about 1975, the Jesuits have St. Mary's again on the market.

1967 immaculataSummer - The Jesuits leave St. Mary's. The Jesuit superiors decided to move the Theologate of the Missouri Province back to St. Louis. A large auction is held, the highlight of which is the historic bishop's chair, hand carved in 1878 [it returned to St. Mary's in 1978]. The place known as St. Mary's Mission and St. Mary's College seems to sleep. Silence closes over the classrooms, the dorms, the refectory - and especially over the empty Immaculata where Our Lord no longer dwells in the tabernacle of the marble altar and the voices of students and seminarians are no longer lifted for the glory of God. During part of these silent years, an old brother caretaker stays on in the Infirmary building.
1948

St. Mary's College celebrates the centenary of its founding. On June 14, in the Immaculata, 39 Jesuits are ordained to the priesthood by the Most Reverend Joseph E. Ritter, S.T.D., Archbishop of St. Louis. Since 1931, 700 priests have been ordained in the Immaculata.

 
1926 The marble Sacred Heart and St. Joseph's altars are added to the Immaculata Chapel, the gift of friends and alumni of St. Mary's, as is the Father Shyne Organ, built by the Wicks Organ Company and installed in the Immaculata choir loft just below the Rose window. "Given in 1926 in honor of the B.V.M. and in grateful remembrance of Rev. C. A. Shyne, S.J., and the College Sodalists who built the Immaculata."
1909

immacMay 23 - Immaculata Chapel is dedicated. It is built of native grey limestone, a jewel of Gothic architecture. The main altar of Italian Carrara marble is the work of the Joseph Sibbel Studio of New York as are the six-foot ivory and white Stations of the Cross. The Immaculate Conception statue is from Genoa, Italy. The magnificent stained glass windows are from the Franz Meyer Glass Company in Munich, Germany, produced by old glassmaking methods lost for centuries and rediscovered in the 1850's. [Note: The Immaculata was not a parish church; as the private chapel of a men's college (and later a seminary), parish functions such as marriages rarely took place there and only with special permission. Instead, the Immculata became known as "Mother of Priests" of which 1,000 would be ordained within her walls.]

1908

 

altarOctober 18 - Permission is given for Holy Mass to be celebrated in the still unfinished chapel; Fr. Kuhlman, S.J., stresses in his sermon the necessity of building an Immaculata in the heart, one that would last for all eternity.

1907 December 9 - On a cold winter's day, the cornerstone is laid for Immaculata Chapel by Right Reverend Thomas F. Lillis, Bishop of Leavenworth, one of Bishop Miage's successors.
1906 December 8, Feast of the Immaculate Conception - At a mass meeting of the Sodality, Fr. C.J. Shyne, S.J., presents his plan: the students should endeavor to obtain funds from the alumni to build a fitting chapel in honor of the Immaculate Conception. The plan was to find 300 subscribers of $100 or more. It was entirely successful. [Fr. Cornelius Shyne (1861-1943) is buried in Mt. Calvary Cemetery in the Jesuit section east of the center circle.]
 



Chronological Order:

1906

December 8, Feast of the Immaculate Conception - At a mass meeting of the Sodality, Fr. C.J. Shyne, S.J., presents his plan: the students should endeavor to obtain funds from the alumni to build a fitting chapel in honor of the Immaculate Conception. The plan was to find 300 subscribers of $100 or more. It was entirely successful. [Fr. Cornelius Shyne (1861-1943) is buried in Mt. Calvary Cemetery in the Jesuit section east of the center circle.]

1907 December 9 - On a cold winter's day, the cornerstone is laid for Immaculata Chapel by Right Reverend Thomas F. Lillis, Bishop of Leavenworth, one of Bishop Miage's successors.

1908

altarOctober 18 - Permission is given for Holy Mass to be celebrated in the still unfinished chapel; Fr. Kuhlman, S.J., stresses in his sermon the necessity of building an Immaculata in the heart, one that would last for all eternity.

1909

immacMay 23 - Immaculata Chapel is dedicated. It is built of native grey limestone, a jewel of Gothic architecture. The main altar of Italian Carrara marble is the work of the Joseph Sibbel Studio of New York as are the six-foot ivory and white Stations of the Cross. The Immaculate Conception statue is from Genoa, Italy. The magnificent stained glass windows are from the Franz Meyer Glass Company in Munich, Germany, produced by old glassmaking methods lost for centuries and rediscovered in the 1850's. [Note: The Immaculata was not a parish church; as the private chapel of a men's college (and later a seminary), parish functions such as marriages rarely took place there and only with special permission. Instead, the Immculata became known as "Mother of Priests" of which 1,000 would be ordained within her walls.]

1926

The marble Sacred Heart and St. Joseph's altars are added to the Immaculata Chapel, the gift of friends and alumni of St. Mary's, as is the Father Shyne Organ, built by the Wicks Organ Company and installed in the Immaculata choir loft just below the Rose window. "Given in 1926 in honor of the B.V.M. and in grateful remembrance of Rev. C. A. Shyne, S.J., and the College Sodalists who built the Immaculata."

1948 St. Mary's College celebrates the centenary of its founding. On June 14, in the Immaculata, 39 Jesuits are ordained to the priesthood by the Most Reverend Joseph E. Ritter, S.T.D., Archbishop of St. Louis. Since 1931, 700 priests have been ordained in the Immaculata.
1967 immaculataSummer - The Jesuits leave St. Mary's. The Jesuit superiors decided to move the Theologate of the Missouri Province back to St. Louis. A large auction is held, the highlight of which is the historic bishop's chair, hand carved in 1878 [it returned to St. Mary's in 1978]. The place known as St. Mary's Mission and St. Mary's College seems to sleep. Silence closes over the classrooms, the dorms, the refectory - and especially over the empty Immaculata where Our Lord no longer dwells in the tabernacle of the marble altar and the voices of students and seminarians are no longer lifted for the glory of God. During part of these silent years, an old brother caretaker stays on in the Infirmary building.
1972 May 23 - In a ceremony that takes place on the porch of the Faculty Building, the use of St. Mary's is returned by the Jesuits to the Prairie Band of the Potawatomi, who requested it to be given to them. The land and buildings are given in trust for the purpose of developing them into an Indian cultural and educational center open to all tribes. Plans include a home for aged Indians, day care center, vocational school, and alcoholic treatment center. None of these plans materialize, and by about 1975, the Jesuits have St. Mary's again on the market.
1977 Autumn - Traditional Catholics discover St. Mary's and begin attempting to interest the Society of St. Pius X in it. At the invitation of a local dentist, Dr. Eugene McKenzie, priests come from what was the the U.S. District Headquarters on the East Coast and have a look at St. Mary's, but decline.
1978 immacMay 22 - His Grace Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre inspects St. Mary's and especially admires the Immaculata Chapel. It is because of this magnificent church that he urges Fr. Bolduc to continue negotiations and find the means to acquire St. Mary's for a traditional Catholic center. The chapel seems to him a symbol, raised up in the heart of America, and destined to favor the Catholic renaissance of our great country. Negotiations continue, and in the end, arrangements are made, by which KATO (A Land Grant Company from Phoenix) donates their interest and a benefactor puts up the remaining amount asked by the Jesuits.
1978 fireNov. 8 - TRAGEDY.  Volunteers had worked all summer to repair the roof, paint, and bring the chapel back to her former glory after squatters had spent a decade in her walls.  Restoration was nearly complete when a spark from an electrical short caused a fire in the choir loft.  Discovered at 12:53 pm, the fire was fought all afternoon by several area fire departments, and was one of the most hard-fought fires that residents could remember.
It was finally brought under control by 4pm.  The roof was gone, the interior completely gutted, some of the priceless stained-glass windows broken.  The walls and porch, however, remained intact.
1979

cornerstone

On August 15th, His Grace officiated at the laying of the cornerstone for the rebuilding of the Immaculata Chapel which burned in a tragic fire in November 1978. Over 1,000 people were present when he applied a trowel full of mortar to the 300 pound piece of Kansas sandstone which was prepared by the Bayer Stone Co. of Saint Marys. Placed in a sealed container with the cornerstone were papers and documents pertaining to the Society of St. Pius X and St. Mary's College, medals, coins and other artifacts, including a current copy of The Angelus. After the blessing of the stone Archbishop Lefebvre called upon two workmen from Saint Mary's Karl Stromberg from California and Albert Gonzalez from Texas to assist him in setting the stone in place.
1980 ruinsMay 31 - Archbishop Lefebvre's reconstruction plan had not yet even started when a severe storm with high winds knocked down part of the fire-eaten front wall, thus crushing the porch.  During the following months, another windstorm destoyed the back wall, which fortunately fell outward, leaving the high altar and the statue of Our Lady of Grace untouched.  Also, during these storms, part of the west side wall fell in.  Damage there included the crushing of the side altars.
1990 May 25 - Bulldozing begins behind the Immaculata to prepare for rebuilding the church and making a back road to it.  The walls of an old Jesuit cistern are found behind the church, and is converted to a workshop dedicated to the rebuilding of the chapel.
1991 Oct. 2 - A new steeple is fitted to the top of the bell tower by an enormous crane.  The steeple itself weighs over 9,000 pounds, and is topped by a gleaming 6-foot copper cross.
1992 Spring - Progress is made in the bell tower of the Immaculata.  Floors, windows, and staircases are completely renovated, making the tower watertight for the first time in nearly fifteen years!
2000 The parish grows to over 2,000 souls. Current rebuilding plans would encompass a 500-seat chapel, which would not even begin to serve the needs of the growing parish and school.  Plans to rebuild the Immaculata in its current form are halted.
2004 Late Winter - A committee is established to investigate the feasibility of constructing a completely new chapel to meet the needs of St. Mary's.  Work progresses from the ground up, starting a fundraising program, and beginning an architect search.
2007

Dec. 25 - Schematic drawings are returned to St. Mary's from McCrery Architects of Washington DC, showing a proposed "New Immaculata"

2008

Spring - Bishop Bernard Fellay, Superior General of the Society of St. Pius X, approves the project with these words: 

"I am totally in favor of the proposed plan to build a great church in St. Mary's in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary for the glory of God. Such a magnificent project will take time to complete. It is a problem of our time that we want everything done immediately and perfectly. In past ages, people would go forward gradually. Recall the great cathedrals of Europe, which took over a century to complete!

On my part, there is no problem with the plans to begin now what is necessary to have a 'workable' church in the near future and leave for later, what I call the finishing of the project - like the bell towers and other elements of completion. I am satisfied with the general plan of the building and wish God's blessing on this project.

God's generosity will not be outdone. May the faithful generously support this project, which will demand sacrifice, in order to build a magnificent church in St. Mary's for the glory of God and the honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary."

  Sunday, Mar. 30 - Rector Fr. Vicente Griego "kicks off" the project in St. Marys, asking the parishioners to donate for their new spiritual home. 

 

Late Summer – The faithful in St. Mary’s respond generously to Fr. Griego’s spring appeal: by the end of 2008, $640,000.00 dollars in cash are raised and $187,000.00 dollars are pledged in St. Mary’s. 

 

Aug. 15 - St. Mary’s bids a fond farewell to Fr. Vicente Griego and welcomes new rector, Fr. John Fullerton.  Fr. Griego takes up his new assignment as rector of the SSPX’s Holy Cross Seminary in Goulburn, Australia, while Fr. Fullerton comes to St. Mary’s after his term as District Superior for the SSPX’s North American district.

2009 A professional cost estimator from the SSPX parish in Denver goes through all the proposed “New Immaculata” blueprints.  It is determined that the high Gothic design proposed by McCrery Architects admirably fulfills our requirement for a design that is traditional in style, beautiful, and large enough to seat our growing parish.  However, the design will exceed the budgeted cost of $10 million dollars.
 

Dec. 31 – Donations continue to arrive: in 2009, $262,000.00 dollars in cash and $65,000.00 dollars in pledges are committed to the project.

2010

Schwerdt Design Group, an architecture firm in Topeka, Kansas is hired to make the New Immaculata design fit within our budget.  A simpler, country Gothic style design is conceived to honor the original Immaculata, complement campus architecture, and meet the budget requirements.

2011

Spring - Schwerdt begins presenting their design changes: a single bell-tower instead of two towers; reducing the interior nave height from 90 feet to 67 feet; smaller window openings; and simplified exterior walls, with less niches, angles, and projections than the previous design.  Seating capacity remains at roughly 1,300.

 

Fall - Not counting pledges, nearly $1.3 million in cash has been raised for the New Immaculata project.  Preliminary cost estimate work is done on Schwerdt’s modified design and concludes that the country Gothic design is within our budget.  Fr. Fullerton reports on the progress in his September newsletter to Friends and Benefactors:

“With another school year off to a smooth start, I wish to dedicate this month’s letter to updating you on the New Immaculata Building Project.
In March of 2010, I mentioned that we were in the process of hiring a new architectural firm for the purpose of designing a simpler, country Gothic style church that would honor the legacy of the original Immaculata, harmonize much better with the present architecture of our campus, and bring the project cost down to the original budget of $10 million dollars.  Following the advice of several professionals from our parish in St. Mary’s and from the parish in Denver, we decided to hire an architectural firm from nearby Topeka to redesign the project.
After nearly a year of careful consideration and diligent work, I am happy to say that the new design is nearly complete.  Several pictures of these plans are included in this flyer, and final drawings will be available on our newly designed website by November. 
The new design will meet the pressing needs of our large (over 3,100 faithful) and ever-growing parish.  With comfortable seating for 1,300 faithful, the new church will alleviate the current overcrowding at our 5 Sunday Masses.  Our elderly and disabled parishioners will find all levels of the new building accessible.  A crypt chapel with many side altars will provide our large priest community, as well as visiting priests, sufficient space to offer daily the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.  The basement will include extra classroom space for Academy and catechism classes. 
In the next few months, once the schematic design phase is complete, we hope to develop a building plan that divides the project into phases, allows us to set concrete fundraising goals, and prepares us to break ground in a few years.  We will keep you informed of the progress.
The task of fundraising is always difficult, more so in the present economic crisis.  Over the past years, your sacrifices, both spiritual and material, in behalf of our parish and schools, have enabled us to continue providing Catholic education for our youth.  We are extremely grateful for your past contributions that amount to nearly $1.3 million for the new church.  Thank you for continuing your support now and in the future.  Your generosity is helping us to make the restoration of all things in Christ a reality.  May God reward you abundantly.”

   
   
   
   
   
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